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La GEM en temps difficiles : Comment mettre fin à la violence sectaire

Depuis le mois de janvier, le Nigeria est déchiré par les conflits sectaires. « Il y a eu une inhumation en fosse commune avant-hier et on compte près de trois cents corps, dont plus de 80 % de femmes et d’enfants » a indiqué John Dada, membre d'APC, à APC. « Quelle ironie qu'en ce mois de célébration de la Journée de la femme, de telles atrocités soient commises envers des femmes et des enfants innocents ». Les femmes sont culturellement respectées puisque ce sont elles qui donnent la vie, et si John rejette la faute de ce bouleversement culturel à la pauvreté croissante et l’isolement économique, il entrevoit tout de même des solutions possibles. Read more
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Peru's farmers lack information: Why are telecentres being underused?

Smallholders in the desert region of Huaral depend on irrigation cooperatives to water their crops. For ten years one coop association has been developing an information system based on telecentres to help them to make informed agricultural decisions. But the system is being under-utilised and they decided to find what was going wrong. Using APC's Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM) they found that older people and women over 40 were being left behind. While decision-making spaces are still mainly all-male, at least some issues identified by women are now on the table.Read more
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GEM in Hard Times: Sectarian violence in Nigeria can be beaten

Women of JosKAFANCHAN (John Dada, Fantsuam Foundation for APC) - Since January, sectarian strife has ripped through Nigerian communities.  “A mass burial took place the day before yesterday and body counts are close to three hundred with over 80% of them women and children,” APC member John Dada told APC. “It is ironic that in the month of the Celebration of Women’s Day, such atrocities are being visited on innocent women and children.” Women are culturally respected as the givers of life and John blames deepening poverty and economic alienation for the cultural reversal but he sees a potential solution.Read more

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Introducing internet into Pakistan's rural schools: girls don't want to be left behind

It was by coincidence that 29 year-old software developer Huda Sarfraz got involved in the Dareecha project. The project, which aims to bring the internet to rural school children and teachers, helped young girls and boys in Pakistan's rural communities learn to use and create content on the internet. Contrary to their expectations, the girls wanted to use the internet just as much as boys did; and despite the additional challenges young girls faced they came in numbers to the extra curricular classes, and were among the winners for the best websites held by the Centre for Research in Urdu Language Processing. The APC's Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM) also had a part to play in contributing to and measuring the project's success.Read more

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Internet, schoolchildren and rural Pakistan: How to get community buy-in including for girls

School girls in Pakistan during a computer classCALGARY (LC and KAH for APC) – In rural Pakistan girls schools are sometimes burned to the ground, so when twenty-nine year old Huda Sarfraz and her team started to teach Punjabi girls how to create websites and use online chat, she feared they might be run out of town. However the girls clamoured to learn as much as the boys did and --overturning societal taboos-- over-subscribed for the extra-curricular classes – ending up producing prize-winning websites. As a result of exposure to APC's Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM), and despite their own cultural reservations, Sarfraz's team focused specifically on getting girls and women teachers involved. “Initially, we only saw two groups to work with -- students and teachers. However because of GEM, we looked at them as four—girl students, boy students, women teachers and men teachers,” says Sarfraz.

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Rural e-governance in India: For whom?

In India’s rural e-governance initiative, 33% of local government seats are reserved for women. Rural village heads of Chhattisgarh State – one of India's poorest-- can now participate in the public process and in theory remotely communicate the needs of their villages through the use of a low-cost computer that does not require computer literacy. But women are not taking the active roles that were expected. Using GEM, APC's gender evaluation methodology, Dr. Anupama Saxena and her team are finding out why winning an electoral seat does not necessarily guarantee that your voice is heard within the governance system if you are a woman.

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Telecentres in Uganda do not appeal to rural women

In rural Uganda, telecentres that have been established to promote rural access to information and foster development are not getting the results they had hoped for. Using the APC WNSP's Gender Evaluation Methodology (GEM) to understand why this is so, UgaBYTES, a Uganda-based NGO that works to promote access to ICTs in rural East Africa, has found that beyond the common obstacles to access like technical infrastructure, connection costs and computer literacy, women face numerous additional barriers if they want to use ICTs to improve their lives.Read more

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Photos now on flickr - Fotos del encuentro ahora en linea

Hi everyone, Photos from the GEM exchange have now been uploaded to the APC WNSP Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/apcwomen/sets/72157623146244666/. Be sure to go check them out! Las fotos del encuentro GEM en Bali están ahora en línea, en la página Flickr del PARM. No tarden en ir a ver las! http://www.flickr.com/photos/apcwomen/sets/72157623146244666/
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Women over 35: Too old for technology?

Findings from gender evaluations on ICT use, point to the fact that women over the age of 35 are often times considered “too old” to use ICTs and learn about computer technology. This is especially true in rural areas of Latin America, where women over 35 complain that their children in particular think that they are not fit to surf the internet because of their age, and that it would be hard for them to learn to send emails and handle computer software.Read more

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